#worldpride2017
Fotografía de la manifestación del Orgullo 2012

Equality laws

At the beginning of the 21st century, after different domestic partnership laws had been passed on a regional level, FELGTB was committed to taking the next step towards legal equality: marriage equality.

Under the government of Jose María Aznar, FELGTB was invited to the Moncloa Palace (the official residence of the Prime Minister). There the activists were told that, if they conceded in withdrawing their demand for marriage equality, the government would pass any domestic partnership law they asked for. The response they gave, however, was clear: equality, if not complete, is not really equality. Just a few years later, in 2005, the Congress of Deputies would end up legalizing equal marriage by reforming the Civil Code.

Months later, the People’s Party filed before the Constitutional Court what activists dubbed the “appeal of shame”, arguing that the only valid marriage is that between a man and a woman. After seven years during which the LGBT movement continued to defend the community’s families, in November 2012 the Constitutional Court sentenced that the right to marriage could not be restricted on the basis of sexual orientation.

In addition to marriage, the LGBT group also focused on fighting for trans rights. In 2007, the Gender Identity Act was passed, which allowed transexuals to legally change their name and gender without having to undergo surgery. The act also provided trans people a secure legal framework during their transition.

Spain was now heading the defence of LGBT rights.

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